More From: Lawn & Garden

New Stayhold Cargo Organizers at Smith & Edwards

Fresh new must-have: StayHold Trunk Organizers

- posted by Rose Marion

With the New Year, people are thinking about organizing & redecorating! (We're doing a LOT that here at the store, too!)

Here's something people have learned the hard way: paint cans like to TIP OVER in the trunk. That's bad news!

StayHold trunk organizers use VELCRO to stick to the carpet on the bottom of your trunk & brace things in place - paint cans, bleach, groceries, plants, and more.
Stayhold Velcro Trunk Organizers at Smith & Edwards
Lightweight but tough, these plastic organizers can also hold your hunting, fishing, & emergency gear in place.

These car & truck cargo organizers are selling very well, so check them out on aisle 44 by the Rope Room at Smith & Edwards! You can also click here to see them on our Web Store.

John's leaf blower tips for spring troubleshooting

John's 4 Stihl Leaf Blower Tips

- posted by Jerica Keyes

After a long, cold winter, it's time to clean up. Planting new flowers, mowing the lawn - all the little things to make your yard beautiful again. It's the time of year to break out all our lawn care equipment again.

As people are preparing for the summer, we often get questions about troubles getting all the tools tools to start up after long, cold winter storage.

Tool Troubleshooting: 4 Leaf Blower Tips

Many people are ready to use their gas powered leaf blowers, but it can be hard to get them started after winter. John, part of our team in the Lawn & Garden department, has thought of 4 possible solutions for this:

  1. Stale fuel. Fuel doesn't last forever. If it doesn't get used, it can get old and stop functioning how it's supposed to. Try refilling with clean, fresh fuel. Click here to check out the best EPA-compliant fuel cans we've found.
    Try adding fresh fuel to your blower!
  2. Spark plugs. This is a very common solution for blowers not starting. Check your spark plugs, and if any of them have build-up, it's time for a replacement.
    Check your spark plugs on your leaf blower!
  3. Air filter. Check that your air filter is clean and not plugged up. If not, you know it's time for a change.
    Check your leaf blower's air filter
  4. Fuel filter. Not as common, but equally a potential solution. Check that your fuel filter isn't clogged up. If that's the case, replace it with a new filter.
    Check that your leaf blower's fuel filter isn't clogged!

Note: Not all models of Stihl Gas Powered Leaf Blowers are the same. Check for your model manual by clicking here.

John and the Stihl leaf blowers at Smith & Edwards

Thanks for the leaf blower tips, John!

Thanks John! These are his best tips, and if these don't work, you can consult your blower model's manual for more advice here at stihlusa.com.

Photos by Rose Marion.

Can SureCan...? This gas can sure can!

- posted by Jerica Keyes

Now, I know what you’re thinking… another gas can?? Yes!

SureCan is a new and renovated gas can that is becoming popular in various local businesses, including here at Smith and Edwards. The SureCan is made in the USA and the company is local here in Ogden, Utah. The Standard Examiner just recently featured Brad Ouderkirk, owner of the SureCan, in an article as well. Click here to see the article.

You can win your own SureCan gas can this week! Scroll down to enter to win.

Watch the SureCan in Action


We know and understand the typical issues with gas cans... they tip over and spill gas all over, they are hard to aim when pouring into your machine, and they can leak. The frustration is discouraging and totally not worth it.

That is why I wanted to tell you about this awesome, brand new product we are carrying! The SureCan gas can is guaranteed no spill, no leak, and gas-free hands after using it. But what makes it different from other gas cans? I asked Randy, our Lawn and Garden department manager, exactly what makes it unique.

"The features speak for themselves," Randy told me as he showed me the flexible, rotating nozzle and the thumb-release trigger. No more messy tipping and aiming! After using this can, we have had people tell us just how easy it is to use.

"Lifting a 5 gallon gas can and tipping is not easy," Randy says. But this new, renovated gas can solves that problem. So yes... SureCan sure can!

SureCan: Feed Your Machines

Get it now!

SureCan 5 gallon gas can
Click to get your 5 gallon SureCan!
SureCan 2.2 gallon gas can
Click to get your 2.2 gallon SureCan!

 

Also available in store at Smith and Edwards! Exit 351 off I-15 in Ogden, Uah - Find it in the Lawn and Garden department in the front of the store.

Emission Control Information:

This container complies with U.S. EPA emission regulations for portable fuel containers (40 CFR Part 59). The emissions warranty is valid for a minimum of one year from date of purchase.

Win Your Own!

Enter the giveaway

Check out Sporting Goods!

See all Boating accessories, Camping, Hiking, Hunting, Fishing, and more.

Click to Shop Sporting Goods here

Utah company Burnett Metal Art featured on Smith & Edwards

Personalize Your Garden with Utah Original Art

- posted by Rebecca Adams

Spring is all about getting out and enjoying the beauty of the outdoors. Smith and Edwards has fresh flowers, planters, and garden accessories that will help you create that perfect outdoor haven.

You can find the perfect way to organize your beautiful garden with Burnett Metal Art garden markers - made right here in Utah!

Personalize your garden with Utah's original Burnett Metal Art

An amazing line of garden markers!

Burnett Metal Art is a Utah based company out of Garland. The Burnetts have found that being a Utah-based company has brought in a lot of business because the people are great to work with, and Utah is a great state for small businesses. The Burnett family has owned and operated this welding and fabrication business for over 100 years!

After purchasing their CNC plasma table in 2011, Brody and Weston Burnett, two of the sons, and their wives, Kara and Trista, started Burnett Metal Art. Daughter Tristin (Burnett) Lindsay is head designer for product development. I had the pleasure of talking to Tristin and ask her a few questions about the company.

The Burnett Family

The Burnett Family

Q. What inspired your family to create this business?

A. One of our big inspirations came from our mother, Susan. She has collected all varieties of nativity scenes throughout her life. She wanted us to design and cut her one from metal. She has helped us design a few of our nativities as well. We now have about 13-15 nativities designed and we have plans to have 50 designed and available in the next 2 years.

Q. What drives you in your business?

A. Our motivation comes from when our customers get excited about new products we design and produce. We get satisfaction out of seeing our products displayed in yards when we drive down roads and even go out of our small town and see our products in yards or on houses in other areas!

Our motivation also comes from being able to design things that we would like in our own homes and yards and being able to use them ourselves. We are also motivated and determined to make Burnett Metal Art as successful as our welding business has been.

Q. How big is your company? Have you or are you thinking about growing across America?

A. We currently have 8 employees. The company started with just a few products and now has nearly 100 products and is sold in over 12 locations in Utah, as well as online.

We have the desire and a plan in place to start Burnett Metal Art spreading across America. We are working with different retail outlets to expand our reach outside of Utah.

Q. What are your most popular items? Any customer favorites?

A. Our most popular items are our yard art and garden markers. We also sell a lot of our nativity scenes as well. Our customer favorites are our garden markers and yard art as well. We are hoping that our Holiday line will be just as big with our customer base.

Q. Why do customers love your garden markers?

A. Our products are built to last. We make each one durable and long lasting. They are a unique product to enhance your home or garden. We can also customize any product to make it unique and specific to your taste.

Q. What makes Burnett Metal Art unique?

A. Our company is unique because it is a family owned business. It started with our father working at the welding shop, then going to owner, and now 4 siblings are working here as well.

Q. Is there any history or background that makes your company what it is?

A. The business was originally a blacksmith shop that started over 100 years ago and has progressed to a Welding and Fabrication Shop. Now we have added the Metal Art business as well!

Q. What is your favorite product to sell - or is there a product in the future that you are going to add to your already creative collection?

A. We love selling our garden stuff the most. We have plans of adding decorative metal furniture to our collection.


It was amazing to be able to talk and find out more about these garden and yard markers that are made right here in the U.S.A. - thanks, Tristin! Smith & Edwards loves featuring small businesses like Burnett Metal Art - especially family-owned businesses based in Utah, just like us. These fun metal garden markers make great additions to your garden and outdoor decorations!
Radishes metal garden marker from Burnett at Smith & Edwards

You can find these cute garden markers by clicking here.

Potted Flowers

Add Color to your Garden with These Flowers

- posted by Rose Marion

What's your favorite thing about spring?

Is it getting away from the snow & frost in favor of 60- and 70-degree weather? Buds and new growth on the trees? Hearing birds returning and singing in the morning? Starting to be able to get on the water and fish again?

I've been so lucky - not having a garden I'm proud of yet, I've gotten to enjoy the huge variety of flowers here every day at Smith & Edwards. It's been a beautiful spring here at Smith & Edwards with the amazing flowers at the store entrance!

White Alyssum

White Alyssum

White pansies

White pansies

Golden Fleece Dahlberg Daisies

Golden Fleece Dahlberg Daisies

Yellow Potted Dahlinova Hypnotica flowers

Yellow Dahlinova Hypnotica

Dahlberg daisies and alyssum

Dahlberg daisies and alyssum

Calibrachoa in hanging baskets

Little Calibrachoa flowers in hanging baskets

Petunia hanging baskets and a bird bath

Petunia hanging baskets and a bird bath... with a friend!

Orange Begonias in a Hanging Basket

Orange Begonias in a Hanging Basket

Purple Petunias getting a drink

Purple Petunias getting a drink

Forget-me-Nots

Forget-me-Nots

White Fuchsias in hanging baskets

White Fuchsias in hanging baskets

Pretty red and pink geraniums

Pretty red and pink geraniums

Geraniums and more flowers at Smith & Edwards

Geraniums and more plants

Colorful Calibrachoa in hanging baskets

Colorful Calibrachoa in white, lavender, lemon, and cranberry

"Supertunias" in hanging baskets

Purple "Supertunias" in hanging baskets

Sizzler Pink Salvia

Sizzler Pink Salvia

Sundial Yellow Portulaca

Sundial Yellow Portulaca

Cute white Dahlberg Daisies

Cute white Dahlberg Daisies

Pink flowers in hanging baskets

Pink "supertunias" in hanging baskets

Potted Flowers

Potted Geraniums and Dahlinova Hypnotica (peach-colored)

Dahlinova Hypnotica

Purple Alyssum

Purple Alyssum

Strawberries growing in Hanging Baskets

Strawberries growing in Hanging Baskets

 

Bronze Leaf White Wax Begonias

Bronze Leaf White Wax Begonias

White Begonias

White Begonias

Sweet William

Sweet William

Sweet Williams  and Alyssum on Handy Bucket Builder racks

Sweet Williams and Alyssum on Handy Bucket Builder racks

(Told you we used the Handy Bucket Builders for holding flowers!) :)

Asparagus Ferns

Asparagus Ferns

These Wishbone Flowers look like little snapdragons!

These Wishbone Flowers look like little snapdragons!

Impatiens

Impatiens

Flowering marigolds

Flowering marigolds

Marigolds

Orange and Crimson Celosia

Orange and Crimson Celosia

Kimono Orange Celosia

Kimono Orange Celosia

Orange begonias in a hanging basket

All of these flowers have been chosen to thrive in our climate. You'll get hardy Utah garden flowers that will bloom this year (annual) or year after year (perennials)... and not to mention trees and veggies! Check out the online USU's Extension Office for more information on Utah flowers.

Tomatoes in the sun

We have several types of tomatoes this year!

Smith & Edwards tomatoes

This one's a winner! We've got Better Boy, Beefsteak, and made-for-Utah Hamson DX 52-12 varieties of tomatoes this year!

And not just tomatoes: you'll also find 4 types of cucumbers and also pumpkins and squash ready for you to take home and plant.

(And you'll find TONS of seeds for all kinds of flowers, herbs, and veggies - both hybrids and heirloom seeds - inside Smith & Edwards, as well as everything you need to start them indoors!)

Corkscrew Willow trees

Corkscrew Willow trees

You'll find a huge variety of maple trees at Smith and Edwards

You'll find a huge variety of maple trees at Smith and Edwards this year: Autumn Blaze, Crimson King, Norway, and Lace Leaf Maples.

Quaking Aspen trees and hanging baskets

Quaking Aspen trees and hanging baskets

Splendens with beautiful leaves

Splendens with beautiful leaves

Striking leaves also on these Wizard Mix Coleus

Striking leaves also on these Wizard Mix Coleus

Decorate your porch with this flighty hummingbird ornament!

Decorate your porch with this flighty hummingbird ornament!

Gardening and Watering tools in every color

Gardening and Watering tools in every color

Garden Markers

Garden Markers

Fun garden ornaments

Fun garden ornaments

Come in and see our Garden Center at Smith and Edwards!

Come in and see our Garden Center!

What's the best time to pick up your flowers at Smith & Edwards? We start getting pansies as soon as we can, around March every year, and then you'll find more and more flowers with a huge selection of flowers, tomatoes, trees and fruit trees, and much more by Mother's Day.

I'll be bringing some home to kick start my own garden this year!

Tell me - what flowers are your favorite in the spring? Leave your favorite in the comments below!

How to Plant a Garden

- posted by Rose Marion

Today we had students from Weber High School's FFA Agricultural Education program come and help us teach Plain City Preschoolers how to plant a garden! Two classes of preschoolers got to plant their own pansies for free, as well as tour the store and have a bunch of fun collecting treats (click to see pictures).

Since they were so good at helping plant flowers - and they happen to be in a Plant & Soil Science class - I asked Lindsey, Zeanne, Devin, and Bryan for their tips on how to plant a garden. And they sure had good information!

Mr. David Shaffer and Lindsey, Zeanne, Devin, and Bryan at Smith and Edwards

Bryan, Devin, Zeanne, and Lindsey with Mr. David Shaffer, Weber High School Plant & Soil Science teacher - thanks for your help!

What's it Take to Plant a Garden?

Tools

You just need some basic tools to plant a garden: a shovel, trowel, gloves, and a sprinkler or sprinkler system are about the basics. There are some more sophisticated pieces of equipment we'll get to in a moment!

Aside from tools, you'll also need soil, of course, seeds or established plants, and sunlight.

Time

How much work is a garden? Well, when you taste that first tomato or arrange your first big bouquet of flowers all from your garden, it'll seem like hardly any work at all.

But, you will want to set aside about 2-4 hours a week to keep your garden in its best shape. you'll want to Inspect your garden every day, looking for wilting, dead growth, holes in your fence. Then each week, Prune any plants that are growing out of place or have dead branches. Water your plants as they need it - remember in the summer, morning is the best time of day to water. And Weed your garden! Turning a blind eye this week can cause an invasion next week. Get out there and protect the hard work you've done already by spending a little time each week going after those weeds. Last but not least, Harvest the fruits of your labor!

Know your Plants

Make sure you read the information about the plants you choose. It'll tell you how much you need to water, and what amount of sun the plant needs. This is important!

There are 2 key things that determine how much you need to water.

  1. The plant's needs
  2. Your soil

After you address those, then you can factor in the weather, temperature, and climate.

What do you Plant - and Where?

How do you choose what to plant together? The Weber High students had great ideas here. You'll want to plant like with like for the best health of your garden. For example, plant cool season crops together, like lettuce and cabbage. Then plant legumes and wax beans together, and then tomatoes, potatoes, and peppers.

Then the next year, you can rotate your crops (it's not just for large-scale farming!) - even flowers can be rotated.

Why rotate crops? It's a smart thing to do - really! There are 2 big benefits.

First, each of the types of plants uses the soil in a different way. Some draw on a particular nutrient, and others enrich the soil, like legumes will add nitrogen. This means you'll have a richer soil, will be able to fertilize less, and if you have dry or poor soil to start with, this will be a great way to enrich your soil.

The other reason to rotate your crops is to stay ahead of diseases and pests.

Bonus: Did you know Marigolds are great for repelling pests?

How to use Fertilizer

Fertilizer is a way of delivering plants the nutrients they need to grow, beyond what they get from soil, sunlight, and water. The big 3 nutrients you'll find on every bag of fertilizer are Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Potassium.

When should you fertilize? Wait until your seeds and plants have germinated and start growing. Then you can add the fertilizer of your choice, be it from a box or from a bag of chicken manure.

Remember, this is just adding to the nutrients your plants are already getting from the soil. If you're going to add fertilizer, use it in moderation.

Just like we as humans don't grow or thrive if we eat too much of a good thing, your plants may not grow properly if they get too much fertilizer. You'll get the hang of a good balance by adding a little at a time.

Tip: Do you mow your lawn and collect the clippings in a bag? Mulch up those clippings and mix them into your soil in the spring. This will infuse your soil with a ton of nitrogen. You could even reduce fertilizing your lawn from 4 times a year to just 3 times by spreading mulched grass clippings over your lawn!

Here's that sophisticated equipment we were talking about: You can rent a mulcher, or get a mulching lawnmower that will chop up grass clippings and lay it on your lawn, doing all the work for you. But, you'd want to make sure you don't get thatch, which is a thick buildup of mulch, sitting on your lawn. That's because thatch will cause a shallow root base in your lawn, and insects will start to live in the thatch. To prevent that, you can get a dethatcher and an aerating machine and break up the thatch and aerate the lawn.

How to Protect Your Garden

A white picket fence seems like the finishing touch on your "perfect garden." But let's make sure to pick the right fence!

There are several reasons for having a fence: keeping animals like deer and rabbits out, and keeping your garden contained. Before you set your heart on a vinyl or wooden fence that blocks out the neighbors, remember this: the best gardens have fences you can see through.

Why's that? Well - and we're not advocating a chain link fence - you need to give your garden as much sun as possible. Barricading the sun along the edges of your garden creates shade, which means your plants won't be producing as much as they could - in fact, full sun plants will grow slim and try to spread and stretch when they're in the shade, rather than growing hearty vegetables, fruits, or flowers for you.

Blossoming trees at Smith and Edwards

I mean, the chain link fence suits us just fine, but you may have a different aesthetic

One great recommendation the Weber High students had was chicken wire. Whichever kind of fence you have, take a weekend and run chicken wire along the bottom of it. And not just above the dirt! Dig down and place that chicken wire under the fence and tamp the dirt back down on top of it. This will help stop the rabbits from burrowing into your beautiful garden!

Where to start?

Utah has a great climate for growing all sorts of plants! Strawberries, Cucumbers, Pumpkins, and Squash all do really well here and will give your family great food throughout the summer.

And don't forget tomatoes! Tomatoes grow really well in Utah. In fact, Utah State developed a special tomato specifically for Northern Utah, called Hamson DX 52-12 (catchy, right?). It's a flavorful tomato, with medium juice, that's great in a BLT.

Bonus Tips: Using a Greenhouse to Extend Growing Season

Start seedlings in a greenhouse - the frost can still get plants well into spring, so protect them and start them in the greenhouse, then transplant them to your garden beds when they're ready.

You can even keep your trees and tomatoes growing all year by keeping them in a greenhouse, too! While your plants won't get as much sun, you can control that environment. This means you can control the amount of moisture and even CO2 in the greenhouse. You can also hang UV lights to help the plants grow. While some plants may not flourish in a greenhouse, it's a great way to either start your plants early or keep them producing year-round while there's snow on the ground in January.

Just make sure to keep your greenhouse plants in pots, because transplanting flowers or trees once or twice isn't too hard on plants - but every move is added stress on the plant. So rather than planting a tomato or tree for the summer, keep it in its pot and move the pot outside in the spring, and back in the greenhouse for the winter.

Have questions or success stories about your garden? Leave a comment below!

About Weber High's FFA Program

The FFA program (Future Farmers of America) is part of Weber High School's Career & Technical Education (CTE) program. 10th through 12th graders are offered two Pathways, Horticulture or Animal Sciences, which students can use to prepare for their careers - not just in production agriculture, but landscaping, veterinarian sciences, and even government careers including the Department of Natural Resources, Division of Wildlife Resources, and more.

Big thanks again to Mr. David Shaffer and Lindsey, Zeanne, Devin, and Bryan from Weber High School!


Do you know of a preschool that would love to plant flowers and have a fun time at Smith & Edwards? Call 801-731-1120 or email vickie@smithandedwards.com. This is a free program and your kids will love it!