More From: Western Tack

How to tie a Double Diamond Knot

How to tie a Double Diamond Knot and Horse Packing Q&A

- posted by Rose Marion

We were privileged to have Travis Sparks come by and do a packing demo the other day. Hunting is a totally different experience with horses. One hunter told me his story about finally getting his deer right at the end of the day, and was dreading the hike back uphill to the truck. Luckily some horse packers saw him, came down, and helped him quarter & pack out the deer. He would have been out there way past sunset without their help!

Packing isn't just about packing out quarters. Your mule or horse might have tent poles, a shovel, lawn chairs, your bedroll, coolers, cooking supplies, or feed on his back. When you throw in antlers into the mix, packing turns into a real art & skill developed through practice.

Travis is a member of the Back Country Horsemen of Utah & does a lot of packing himself. He gave us a detailed demonstration of the Double Diamond hitch, and answered several questions about packing.

Watch Horse Packing Tips & Knot How-To

I split Travis's presentation into two videos for you. First, you can see exactly how to do the Double Diamond knot on our trusted cavalry horse. This is a great hitch for top packing. Then, sit back and listen to Travis's question & answer session about packing elk antlers, using a pack scale to balance your load, using soft packs vs hard packs, and tightening a cinch.

Packing with a Double Diamond knot

Packing with a Double Diamond knot. Thanks to Troy Higgs for this picture!

Watch: How to tie a Double Diamond Knot

Use a 45-foot rope to make this hitch, which starts out similar to the box hitch. Make sure and pull the rope tight.

Watch: Horse Packing for Hunting Q&A

Where to get those Pack Bags

Smith & Edwards pack bags for hunting on horseback

We make the pack bags shown in Travis's demo, these are the #663 designed for coolers. We also make a narrower bag without flaps, #1665, and #1666 with flaps.

Of course I've got to mention that we proudly make those bearcloth packs you saw in the video, and you can get them right here on our online store. Click here to read about our Tack Workshop.

Do you have questions about horse packing that Marty or Travis can answer for you? Let us know in the comments below!

Travis's Tips for Packing

  • Check your cinch after moving your animal - always make sure it's tight!
  • Your goal is to make everything into a single package that moves together, without a pivot point
  • Keep your horse safe from antlers: make sure the rack moves along with the pack bags. Try not using a stick or a branch to elevate the horns, because they don't ride well.
  • Keep the center of gravity low
  • Keep in mind what will hit a branch first: your pack bags or antlers?
  • Don't take shortcuts, don't get in a hurry - pack it right.
  • Rule of thumb, pack 15% of an animal's weight. So for a 1000 pound animal, aim for 150-160 pounds split over the two sides.
Tips on team roping from our Dummy Ropin' champions!

How to Rope (Video): Team Ropin' Tips

- posted by Rose Marion

Kwade Kosoff and Pace & Wells Thompson stayed after the 2nd Annual Dummy Ropin' here at Smith & Edwards to show us some dummy ropin' runs and give tips on how to head & heel rope.

Head & Heel Ropin' Tips from Kwade & Kyle Kosoff


Dummy ropin' is a ton of fun, whether you're a team roper or a backyard roper. Kyle provided commentary on tips & what to watch for.

dummy-ropin-kyle-kwade-kosoff
dummy-ropin-kyle-kwade-kosoff (1)
Start practicing after school or work and you'll be a pro roper in no time. Then you can come show us your stuff in our next dummy ropin' tournament!

These champions walked away with a Classic rope bag from Equibrand. Thanks to Equibrand, Cactus Ropes, & Lonestar Ropes for providing ropes & prizes!

Dummy Ropin' first round winners!

Pace and Braxton, Round I dummy ropin' winners!

Dummy Ropin' second round winners

Cinch and Stone, Round II winners!

What you need to know to Start Ropin'

Roping Terms & What they Mean

Spoke:
The amount of rope in your loop from the honda to your grip on the rope.
Slack:
The loose part of the rope. You have to pull the slack to pull the rope tight.
Dally:
Securing the rope to your saddlehorn, in Team Roping when riding a horse. If you're not on a horse, still practice pulling your slack and pulling your hands up!
Tip:
Part of the loop, the point of the rope, furthest away from your hand.
Heading:
One player catching the calf dummy around the horns or the neck. Kyle's Tip: Aim at the left horn when you rope the head.
Heeling:
The second player catching the calf dummy around the rear ankles. Kyle's Tip: Aim at the left hock (ankle).
Honda:
The bit of rope that loops & knots to allow for a loop in your rope. Click here to learn how to tie a honda from Tom. Click here to see Marty show how to put on a plastic speedburner.
Lay:
How stiff or soft your rope is. Heelers want a stiffer rope that will hold open longer (to get under the hooves). Heading ropes are softer.

How we Dummy Rope at Smith & Edwards - & you can in your backyard!

You need 3 people: a header, a heeler, and someone to push the dummy.

The header checks in with his heeler, and nods to the person pushing the dummy when he's ready.

The header runs after the dummy and catches the horns or neck. Then, the header pulls the dummy straight, to the left, giving the heeler a good opportunity to get the rope under and around the dummy's back legs. Pull the rope tight (dally the slack), and you've got it!

How to Score

We timed each run, from the moment the dummy moves forward, with a stopwatch. We stop the timer when the dummy is both headed & heeled.

It has to be a legal head catch: both horns, half a head (1 horn), or around the neck. We added a 5 second penalty if only caught one heel.

Come Give it a Try!

Ready to rope, too? Come in to our Western department and pick up your rope & dallies. Or, click over to Shop for Roping Supplies on our website. We'll get you what you need!

Check out Roping gear on our website!

Stay warm in the country with wool clothing, heaters, and horse hoof pads!

Keeping your Horse Warm this Winter

- posted by Rose Marion

Now that we're in the thick of winter, the fishermen are excitedly measuring how thick the ice is on their favorite lakes and reservoirs. (click here for ice fishing tips!)

If you've got horses or livestock, and you don't have heaters, it's a tough time of year! Make sure you have the best winter you can with these tips to stay warm no matter how rural your road.

Keep the Horse Warm

Water

If you don't have any equipment at all, you'll be going out each morning to break the ice with a pitchfork. But you have kids to do the work for you, right?

Well, the kids will thank you for investing in a heater or de-icing system. Get a bucket heater from Smith & Edwards here - you can even get yours delivered!

Frozen horse trough

Horse Blankets

There are all kinds of horse blankets out there, and we like the Equibrand especially. Keep your horse warm and dry from the snow and rain with a blanket that moves with them. This makes for less cleanup work for you, too!

Equibrand 10K Cross Trainer Blanket

Hoof Pads & Snow Boots

If you're venturing into the snow-filled hills on horseback, make sure and ask your farrier about ways to protect your horse. When you're shoeing your horse, you have several options that prevent snow buildup under the horse's hooves. Click here to see hoof pads and boots.

Snow buildup is extremely cold for your horse - plus, kt makes each tread slippery, instead of sure. Plus, the compacted snow adds pressure on the frog, so there are a few styles of hoof pads to keep your horse snow-free.

The Mustad no-snow tube-style hoof pads compresses, and pops back, which prevents the snow from building up on the hoof.
Horse Snow Hoof Pads
The other style, the Snowball black plastic hoof pad, presses a bubble down into the snow, keeping it away from the hoof and giving your horse a surer step.

Keep Yourself Warm

Known for their ranchwear, Schaefer vests & coats are designed to stand up to windstorms and blizzards that would make your eyes tear. Wool vests and jackets will give you years of use.

We love the Wyoming Traders line of wild rags. These 100% silk wild rags will keep you warm without weighing you down. We just got some new Aztec patterns in, and we've got both youth sizes and adult sizes in polka dots, solids, paisley, and more.

Silk is warmer than wool, it gets softer with wear, and naturally wicks moisture away.

Breaking ice in the trough - Wells is wearing a Stormy Kromer hat, and both boys are staying warm with wild rags!

Breaking ice in the trough - Wells is wearing a Stormy Kromer hat, and both boys are staying warm with wild rags!

If you don't have a felt hat, look at a good Stormy Kromer hat. We carry these hats in store and they are so popular! Made in a wool/nylon blend with 100% cotton flannel, these hats are made in USA and are called "an icon of the great American outdoors." This hat's been around for more than 100 years, and it's still made of six hand-stitched panels.

Don't let your fingers freeze! Draw on your foam-lined Yellowstone gloves - an old favorite for standing up to barbed wire, these elkskin and deerskin gloves have a foam-lined option for winter.

Dyeing Rodeo Queen Gear with Rodeo Ink

Right on HUE: Dyeing Rodeo Outfits for Queens with Rodeo Ink

- posted by Jerica Keyes

I have always looked at Rodeo Queen contestants and wondered how they got all their outfits to match so perfectly. It's incredible! From their hats, to their boots, and even their horse tack, it is all the same shade.

A frequent question we get asked is, How do I dye my own rodeo queen outfits? So, we asked around to give you the answers.

A photo posted by Rodeo Ink (@rodeoink) on

If you've ever tried to dye your own rodeo outfits, you've experienced just how hard it really is. Sometimes they can turn out, and other times the whole batch is botched.

So we talked to Ron Hansen, owner of the Rodeo Ink Company. We got the chance to sit down with him and talk to him a little bit about his business Rodeo Ink and dyeing rodeo outfits.

 

 

A photo posted by Rodeo Ink (@rodeoink) on

Dyeing Rodeo Outfits Q&A

S&E: How did you get started?

Ron: Ever since my little girl started doing rodeo queen contests, I've started dyeing her outfits. Pretty soon, word got out, and I began sending out dye orders for rodeo queens all over the states. It's been 5 years now since I've started, and since Rodeo Ink opened for business.

S&E: What are some common mistakes people will make when dyeing on their own?

Ron: Well, dyeing is kind of a tricky thing. Many times, people don't take into account all the different materials and dyes you have to use to get the same shade on everything. People can very easily can ruin a pair of jeans when dyeing. I hear a lot of “Help me fix this!” and a lot of times, stripping the dye out again is nearly impossible.

So I help people start over. Some good jeans to start with when dyeing are white Wranglers, style 13 or 14, and blank white boots. That way the dye goes on in its pure color, and you’re not overlapping and getting strange colors in the end.

S&E: What does a rodeo queen need dyed?

Ron: Just about everything! That includes shirt, jeans, boots, etc. Even reins, saddle pads, and custom tack. I can dye all those all the same color to match the outfit. Also, I have a contact with someone who does custom jewelry, airbrushing, and more.

S&E: What other events do you do dyeing for?

Ron: I do stuff for high school rodeo queen contestants, horse shows, Western pleasure, Texas stock shows, and even youth competitions - not just high schoolers. Also, I have worked with State Queens and Miss Rodeo America contestants.

Pearl and Perri Douglas for Box Elder County Minnie Princess

Pearl and Perri Douglas for Box Elder County Minnie Princess

 

Ron Hansen with Rodeo InkS&E: What's rodeo queening's effect on families?

Ron: Rodeo Queening is a great program for families. I have been involved in rodeo for more than 30 years and I was a rodeo clown & bull fighter for about 13 years. My whole family has been involved in rodeo for 10 years now and we have learned a lot, and not only about rodeo.

Being involved in rodeo queen pageants teaches kids about responsibility and self-worth, which is something that can help these kids out a lot when growing up.

Now We Know!

Thank you Ron! He gave us some awesome tips and ideas and we hope that those were able to help you as well. He’s got a knack for dyeing and says that he can match any color you send him. He recently added a new gal to help him out during the peak season, where they send out about 10-12 pairs in a week to orders from all across the United States and Canada.

If you would like to get into contact with Ron, or would like to look at some of his work, here you can check out his Rodeo Ink Instagram or his Rodeo Ink Facebook page.

Or, if you are interested in dyeing or other gear, come visit us in Ogden, UT, off I-15 at exit 351 - or, click here for Women’s Jeans, Girls' Jeans, Paracord, and Tack. Looking for white jeans for ladies and girls participating in pageants? Check out this link to our favorite Women's White Jeans and Girls White Jeans.

Explore Country Clothing, Camo, Cowboy Boots & more at Smith & Edwards!

Colton Egger - Cutest Cowboy in Texas

The Littlest Cowboy in Texas and his Wild Rag

- posted by Jerica Keyes

Whether you're working out on the ranch, or goin' out on the town, a young cowboy or a timeless one, some things just never change. Just how Wranglers have been around for what seems like forever and they have never lost their style.

As for the Egger family, passing on these timeless traditions to their kids, as well as adding some of their own, is a must.
Colton and his guitar
We recently had this cute little family buy some of the 100% silk Wild Rags we sell here in our store. Afterwards, they sent us some beautiful photos they had taken of their young son, Colton, by Sallie Scott with Country Grace Photography.

Colton Egger posing with his wild rag!

Colton's set up camp and he's ready to play!

The photos turned out so cute! This little cowboy is a natural. And he's got on a Wild Rag! If that doesn't convince you they're good looking, I don't know what will.

The Eggers aren't the only family loving these scarves. Marty Thompson, our Western Tack manager here at Smith and Edwards, and his family also love them. His cute kids know a couple different ways tie a Wild Rag to be the slickest lookin' cowboy around. Click here to see Marty's son Wells show you How to Tie Wild Rags.

Besides being good looking, Wild Rags are really very practical. They can keep you warm in the cold, and wick away the moisture in the heat. Use them to filter out dust in their air and breathe through it, or to filter out dirty water to drink. And those are just some of their many uses!

They come in many different designs and colors, you can choose whichever fits you best. Here at Smith and Edwards, we happen to have a wide selection of Wild Rags to choose from. Click here to see Wild Rags.
Colton at the river
So enjoy your own! Just like the Egger family, you can send us photos of how you use your Wild Rags! Just send us an email at info@smithandedwards.com. And just like Colton, you can be toughest and most handsome cowboy out there.
Colton in his straw cowboy hat

Special thanks to Colton Egger, his dad Clint, and photographer Sallie Scott of Country Grace Photography!

How to install a Mule Hide Horn Wrap

How to wrap a Mule Hide Horn Wrap

- posted by Rose Marion
Elk herd on Highway 89 - photo by Rose Marion

The elk herd over on Highway 89 definitely exists. Check out those earrings!

Everyone knows about the elk herd over on Highway 89, north of Pettingill's and just across the freeway from us. Smith & Edwards, you may not realize, has been raising a mule herd for decades.

I wouldn't tell you a tall tale! These mules have been here in the yard since we started making tack back in 1979. We feed them corn cobs, pemmican bites, leftover MREs, all kinds of things.

That turns them a little blue, just like the mule hide. (Eeyore is a distant bloodline member).

Some times we bring these mules packing with us. They're great for elk quarters as well as bringing all types of fishing gear when we go out to Willard Bay!

Blue Mule - image originally by Dario Urruty via WikipediaAnyway, the reason we have Utah's biggest blue mule herd is to keep up with demand for mule hide horn wraps. And the first question we get from buckaroos and ranch hands is, what's the best way to install a mule hide wrap?

So, Marty made this video to see exactly how it's done. Check out his saddle string tip!

Why use a Mule Hide Horn Wrap?

Wrapping your saddle horn with a strip of mule hide will protect it, but that's just one benefit. Having this strip on your horn will act the opposite of a rubber dally: instead of gripping your rope, the mule hide practically turns to glass and allows you to feed the rope.

So how do you wrap a saddle horn with mule hide?

First, nail the end of the wrap to the bottom of your saddle. Then, bring the wrap up and over the swells. Here's Marty's tip: take your saddle strings and lay them under the wrap.

Then, wrap the mule hide around your horn, making sure to get the swells on your last loop. The last step of the wrap is pulling the end of the wrap underneath your first wrap, using Marty's saddle string trick.
Then, you can use an old shovel handle with a strip of leather to smooth & tighten the wrap, getting rid of any bubbles.

Did you know? The blue color comes from the chrome tan process for these leather strips.

Get your mule hide horn wrap here. That's just one item, we've got tons more saddle accessories, pack bags, grooming & show equipment, and country gifts here!
Shop Western Tack and Country Living supplies at Smith & Edwards!

How to shape a Palm Leaf Cowboy Hat

3 Ways to Shape a Palm Leaf Hat

- posted by Rose Marion

Need some shade at the rodeo or playing after work? Our Western guy Marty can show you how to shape a palm leaf hat today in a Gus, Brick Top, & Buckaroo style.

He shapes these cowboy hats here at the store with a steamer, and you can shape yours with just a bucket of water at home - watch how!

Cowboy Hat Styles

In the Buckaroo style, you'll have a smooth bowl-shaped indent in the crown, round all the way around. Use a bowl or a ball to get this shape. Then you can raise the middle of the indent over another round shape, like a smaller ball, from the inside. You can also shape a nice lip in the top of the crown. The Buckaroo typically has a pretty flat brim, too.

This is the style of hat that Tom wore for his Trek outfit - he shaped it himself!

A Brick Top hat means you have four corners in the brim of the hat, and an even indent.
Buckaroo, Brick Top, and Gus styles you can shape your next hat with!
The most common styles of hat Marty sees is a Cattleman's crown and a Gus. The Cattleman is like the hat Marty's wearing: two dents running from front to back. The Gus is just like the Cattleman's, but the dents are only in the front of the hat.

How to Shape Your Hat at Home

To do this at home, fill a bucket with water. You can use cold water and let it soak a while, or lukewarm will speed it up a bit.

Start with the crown and use your fingers and thumbs to start the shape.

Move to the brim and shape your brim.

Now let it dry. You're all done!

Get a Hat of your Own

Get your own palm leaf hat from Smith & Edwards! We carry a HUGE selection of Sunbody hats, which is our favorite brand of palm leaf hat. These hats are Guatemalan-made and hold their shape nice after you shape them. They come in lots of adult sizes as well as kids' sizes.

Get your own Sunbody hat at Smith & Edwards!

Come in to Smith & Edwards in Farr West and we'll shape one up for you, too!

Not Just A Country Store - Smith and Edwards Manufacturing

- posted by Regan Taylor

Today, I had the privilege of talking with our very own Smith and Edwards brand team. Some may not know this, but Smith and Edwards is a brand name for horse tack, bridles, pack saddles and pack saddle equipment, saddle bags, and leather-working goods.

It doesn't matter if you're an outfitter, hunter, trail rider, rancher, or rodeo cowboy; this brand is for all Western style riders. That's right, we don't just sell top quality Western tack and Western trail riding equipment, we make it too!

The Smith and Edwards company tried out the idea of making their own brand and products back in 1979. What started out as a simple yet solid idea, has soared to a well-respected brand name used by many cowboys in the Western region of the U.S. and is sold to many country/feed stores.

Why? Well it could be that it's a brand made in USA, for USA. Or maybe it's because the company is always looking for ways to improve their products and make them fit customer's needs.

Trying new patterns and different sewing strategies, as well as changing lengths and cutting techniques help the team get a feel for what works and what doesn't based on what our customer is looking for.  Because, after all, your support and feedback is what keeps us going!

 

1662

"Come on. What have you guys really changed to make your products better?"

Well, the Lasal Box Style Pannier is a perfect example. Before, the weight of what you were carrying would weigh down the middle of your bag. The Lasal Pannier now comes with a diamond pocket that the staps go through. This helps it to secure your load and compresses it together to help relieve pressure on the seams.

1662-new

Lasal Box Style Pannier

 

 

CC1662 - Smith and Edwards Criss Cross Strap Set for Lasal Pannier

Criss Cross Strap Set for Lasal Pannier

 

"I buy our pack equipment, headstalls, back cinchas, reins, lasal box style panniers, Utah pack panniers, and mantees. I choose the Smith and Edwards brand because of quality and price. And also because I know if there's a problem I can bring it back and the Smith and Edwards team with get it taken care of for me" -Kris Betts, Western sales

 

661 - Tapered Utah-Style Pack Bag

661

Tapered Utah-Style Pack Bag

 

 

Behind the Scenes of the Smith and Edwards Brand Workshop

"I enjoy working with the people in the Western department. We are almost like a family. Well, I guess we are a family seeming how we spend most of our time together." -Steve Lewis, leatherworker

Our Smith and Edwards Western Department Team

The Smith and Edwards Western Department Team. From left to right: Tom, Dave, Sam, Marty, Jess, Dani, Steve, Kyle, Shaun, Kris, Sherm.

Believe it or not, but it is a rather small team that works together to bring you all these one-of-a-kind products. And they aren't made in some huge factory; instead they are beautifully hand-crafted right here at Smith and Edwards in the back corner of the Western department. The space is also relatively open, meaning our team can be seen, in the store, making these awesome products for you.

Smith and Edwards uses the best materials needed for each product they make. This includes:

  • Hermann Oak Leather: Mainly used on reins and headstalls.
  • Skirting: For cinches and breast collars.
  • Bear cloth: Tough, heavy nylon that doesn't mildew. This is used on all of our pack bags.
  • Latigo: Used in almost everything we make.
  • Canvas: Mantee's, slings, and pack bags are all made with canvas.

IMG_1569

The team uses a few machines, of course, to help them make these products just right. There's an:

  • Edger: This helps to soften and round the edges of the leather.
  • Creaser: To put in the "creases" or lines that give the product a clean and defined finished look.
  • Puncher: For when the team needs to punch multiple holes into the leather at once.
  • Splitter: Used for thinning the leather out.
  • Riveter: Made to squeeze rivets to join two materials together.
  • Sewing machine: The sewing machines Smith and Edwards use are mainly for pack saddle bags, breast collars, and slobber straps.

The Smith and Edwards team designs and makes everything entirely from scratch, from carefully cutting the leather and punching holes to the final sewing touches and branding of our Smith and Edwards name. Each item takes a different amount of time to make and uses a different type of process. This means that our team has to be very knowledgeable and precise about how they work, especially when quality is such a big factor.

662

662

Square Utah-Style Pack Bag

 

"Saddle panniers are probably one of the most time consuming products to make. It can be a challenge cutting the pieces for it out of the leather. I've spent almost a whole day on one lasal bag before." -Tom Donovan, leatherworker

Thanks to Troy Higgs for the amazing photos of his packing trip!

Do you have a photo of your Smith & Edwards gear in action? Send us your photo to info@smithandedwards.com, we'd love to see it!

Why You Should Give Us A Try

The products Smith and Edwards sell are made specifically to work AND to last. The brand isn't a super flashy one, it is better suited for the "working cowboy". Products are made the old-fashioned way, and not mass manufactured. I guess you could say it's more personal that way!

"My favorite part about working back here is being able to take something, cut it up and then piece it back together to make a product one of our customer's will use and love. It's rewarding." -Marty Thompson, Western manager

19228

19228

Heavy Duty Nylon Saddle Bag & Cantle Bag Combo

 

Smith and Edwards has been a store you've trusted to bring you quality products and exceptional customer service for some 50+ years now. So, of course it is expected that our brand name products uphold the same standards, if not higher.

If you love Smith and Edwards, you'll love what we make! Next time you're looking to buy headstalls, bridles, halters, straps, or breast collars for western style riding, think Smith and Edwards. You won't be disappointed!

To get a full listing of our catalog and everything we sell, please click here. (PDF file).

shop-western-online-820-rancher

Click here to find your favorite Western Tack items at Smith and Edwards

 

 

 

 

Kids' Rodeo Outfits for Summer Rodeos

- posted by Misti Kosoff

At Smith and Edwards we like to think that we carry the best western clothing, rodeo gear and rodeo apparel in the area. Rather you are a youth rodeo participate or a PRCA top rodeo cowboy or cowgirl we have what you need to help you be competitive and look good doing it.

(Reminder: Are your kids ready for Mutton Bustin'? Bring them to Smith & Edwards and get registered for Ogden Pioneer Days Rodeo's Mutton Bustin' competition!)

The Bull Rider

Kwade-bull-riderLike many young cowboys this handsome cowboy has big aspirations of being a competitive bull rider... much to his tie down roping Dad's dismay. He found just what he would need to climb on a bull and give it a try.

Kwade-ready-to-rideGear:
Youth Phoenix Safety Vest - rodeo vests & gear available online here
Jr. steer riding rope $74.99 - Barstow ropes available online
Bull Riding Glove $47.99

Kwade-glove
You can explore Rodeo clothing for the whole family online! Click here to explore Wrangler, Cinch, and more Western brands online.
Kwade the bull riderClothing:
Roper solid snap front long sleeve shirt $24.95
Retro Wrangler jeans BRT20 (available online) in Night Sky, 12 oz. premium denim, comfortable mid rise, straight leg fits over cowboy boots. $26.95
Twister 10x hat $64.99
Smith and Edwards offers a full line of kids' and adults' Ariat Boots. You can even choose from Men's, Ladies', and Kids' Spurs as well as Spur Straps.

Kwade-positioning

The Roper

Kolt ropin'This blue-eyed heart breaker loves to rope anything that moves, or doesn't move, in some cases. He is geared up and ready to compete and looking handsome as ever.

Kolt

Gear:
Smith and Edwards offers a full line of Cactus Poly Ropes.
Rattler Boys Goat String $14.95

Kolt with his Rope and Piggin' stringClothing:
Roper plaid button front long sleeve shirt $27.99
Limited edition 20X Wrangler jeans, mid-weight 12.5-oz, relaxed seat, thigh, & knee, straight leg styling fits easily over boots. This jean, 33BLDNS, is available online! $26.95
American Hat Company $99.99

Kolt and the goat string

The Barrel Racer

Gotta have the matching gear!

Gotta have the matching gear!

And what rodeo wouldn't be complete without the sweethearts of the rodeos, the barrel racers. You will have a hard time keeping up with this little cutie and her stick horse "Brownie". She is all about style, bling, and the love of horses.

Gear:
The Troxel Legacy Helmet is a slim profile helmet. The narrow profile offers a classy look while providing the safety all moms desire. $54.99
Nylon Braided Quirt $11.99
Kwincee-belt-and-shirt
Clothing:
Angel Ranch belt $36.99
Wrangler diamond snap, foil embossed, long sleeve shirt. $24.95
Rock '47 girls Wrangler grey embroidered with rhinestone stud back pocket jeans. $31.95

Girls' Rodeo boots, modeled by Kwincee

Pair with her favorite boots, like Justins or Ariats.
Kwincee and BrownieRemember to get your tickets to Ogden Pioneer Days rodeo at Smith & Edwards! Smith & Edwards is a proud supporters of Miss Rodeo Utah and Ogden Pioneer Days, July 20-24. See you at the rodeo!

How to Rope a Cowboy Toy, with Craig Smith

How to Rope a Cowboy Toy

- posted by Rose Marion

If you've ever been dummy ropin', you know how FUN it is... and you don't need to be a team roper on a horse to have fun with it.

Stick a steer head on a bale of hay, or hook up a Smarty dummy to your 4-wheeler - it's as fun as the real thing.

But what about when it's raining, or it's dark out? How you gonna rope then?

Here it is: The living room Cowboy Toy. Born in Texas, our customers LOVE these mini steers! They come with their own rope, interchangeable horns, and the legs even move like a real dummy steer, so you can head 'n heel with the whole family. Craig had to show Curtis with ABC4 Utah how it's done:

This tabletop roping dummy's as fun as it looks!

Gotta have one? Get your own Cowboy Ropin' Toy (and see their big brothers) at SMITHandEDWARDS.com in our Roping Dummy section.
Explore Ropin' dummies at Smith & Edwards

If you haven't seen someone rope the Shorty ropin' dummy, you've gotta checkout our Dummy Ropin' we did back on Valentine's Day! Click here to see some Dummy Ropin' Pictures.
Dummy Ropin, a new tradition at Smith & Edwards!